REDwire Want to succeed at electrostatic measurement? Here are two ways to do it

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Electrical measurement devices, such as electrostatic voltmeters or electrostatic fieldmeters, are used in large-scale industrial applications designed to measure the voltage on the surface of an object

Here is a blast from your physics past: remember the classic principle of electric charges stating like charges repel each other, meaning positive charges repel positive (or negative charges repel negative ones)? How about the rule of positive charges attracting negative charges?

While this “opposites attract” rule could be a hypothesis as to how that popular ‘90s song of the same name was created in pop culture, in the scientific world, the theory of electric charges is premised on the study of electrostatics.

Electrostatics is also commonly referred to as the branch of physics relating to stationary or decelerated electrical charges.

Think back when you received an electrical shock when touching a doorknob? Or do you recall when you took out freshly laundered clothes from the dryer (complete with static cling of a fabric dryer sheet to a shirt or pants)? These situations involve static electricity at work, which is essentially the attraction of charged particles.

On a larger scale, industrial applications need this type of static electricity in order to perform various applications: the automotive sector depends on static electricity to paint cars for even and lasting paint distribution.

In the air quality control and dust extraction industries, air ionizers help remove smoke, dust and particulate, for example, from the air, captured into an isolated mechanism, thanks to static electricity.

Electrical measurement devices, such as electrostatic voltmeters or electrostatic fieldmeters, are used in large-scale industrial applications designed to measure the voltage on the surface of an object.

The importance of electrical measurement accuracy, as well as the elimination of transferring additional electrical current charge to a surface is two major fundamental features electrostatic voltmeters and electrostatic fieldmeters provide.

Here is a quick and simple breakdown of electrostatic voltmeters and electrostatic fieldmeters. For a more comprehensive profile of our electrostatic solutions, contact Monroe Electronics using our coordinates above or visit us at www.monroe-electronics.com.

Electrostatic Voltmeters

Electrostatic voltmeters measure the actual potential voltage of materials without making direct contact on the measured test surface. Known for its high accuracy and stability, electrostatic voltmeters offer drift-free and low-noise measurements autonomous to probe-to-surface separation.

Measurements are typically better than 0.1% of full scale, measuring a range from millivolts to many thousand volts.

Electrostatic Fieldmeters

Electrostatic fieldmeters measure the electrostatic field strength (known as the voltage per unit distance) between the electrical probe and test material.

Accurate electrical measure is achieved when probe-to-surface separation is controlled; field strengths up to kilovolts in the hundreds are measured using this particular device. With a feedback-driven design, operators of fieldmeters are assured accurate, drift-free and non-contacting measurements.

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